Our examinations
Contemporary assessment

Path exams assess the ability to receive information (reading and listening skills) and provide information (speaking and writing skills). Furthermore, we look for evidence of active communication skills. In order to achieve this, our examinations offer more opportunities for free expression of ideas. The relevance and clarity of those ideas may be enough to achieve good marks. Appropriate vocabulary with correct spelling, or clear pronunciation when speaking, is however very important.

We do not want candidates to have to attend lengthy exam preparation classes in order to learn ‘exam techniques’. We are interested in communication skills, so all that is really needed is to attend normal classes.

These are the examinations we offer:

Speaking examinations 

These speaking performance assessments (SPA exams) are designed for children aged 4 or older, adolescents and adults, so that they can certify internationally their first steps in the learning process.

This strand comes in two versions:

CEFR

 

VERSION FOR CHILDREN

CHILDREN’S SPEAKING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (CSPA)

A1 -

CSPA Level I

A1

CSPA Level II

A1 +

CSPA Level III

 

CEFR

 

VERSION FOR ADULTS

ADULTS' SPEAKING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (ASPA)

A1 -

ASPA Level I

A1

ASPA Level II

A1 +

ASPA Level III

Four-skill examinations

These four-skill exams are designed for students of all ages. They comprise speaking, listening, reading and writing modules, which may be taken separately or altogether.

This strand comes in nine levels:

CEFR DISCOVERY LEVELS
A1 -

Entry Level

A1

Access Level

A1 +

Achiever Level

A2

Preliminary Level

A2 +

Elementary Level

CEFR INDEPENDENT LEVELS
B1

Progress Level

B2

Competency Level

CEFR MASTERY LEVELS
C1

First class Level

C2

Expert Level

Our examinations are divided into exam modules, which are carefully designed around the following elements of language use and acquisition:

1.
Domain

These are the broad areas of life in which we function as human beings, and can be categorised as follows:

  • The personal domain concerns us as individuals. It is about our family and friends, hobbies and interests, likes and dislikes.
  • The public domain is where we interact as members of the public, with organisations or other people who are not as close as family and friends. An example is going on holiday, where we interact with representatives of airlines, hotels, restaurants and local people.
  • The educational domain is where we are a part of organised learning, for example at university. It concerns the need for skills such as essay and report writing, as well as abilities to use pragmatic and discursive language.
  • The occupational domain concerns the workplace, and the learner as an employee or member of a profession. It concerns the vocabulary and communicative skills related to our jobs.

2.
Skills

There are, of course, the core skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening.

However, a comprehensive skill set also includes interaction, which concerns the spontaneous exchange of language between two or more people in conversation or transaction, and strategic interaction by email or other written media. Skills also include mediation, where a language user must pass on information, either by speaking or in writing, to another party who was not present when the information was originated, such as passing on a telephone message, or reporting on a political debate.

3.
Competences

There are various competences which inform our ability to use language:

  • Lexical: This concerns the building blocks of language; its vocabulary, expressions and standard phrases.
  • Grammatical: The ability to use correct and accurate grammar forms, in order to provide contexts such as time and comparison.
  • Semantic: This is primarily concerned with the awareness of meaning, grasp of connotation, and the understanding of collocation, synonymy and antonymy.
  • Phonological: This concerns skill in the understanding of, and ability to produce, spoken words and sentences.
  • Orthographic: This concerns skill in the understanding of, and ability to produce, written words and sentences.
  • Sociolinguistic: This is concerned with the social dimension of language, e.g. formality and politeness.
  • Pragmatic: This primarily concerns discursive and interactive skills.
  • Functional: This is concerned with the ability to perform functions such as making enquiries and asking for opinions.
Path LATAM
Data Fiscal

OFFICE IN PUERTO MADERO

Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 740
Floor 3, Office 1
Puerto Madero, Dock 5 (C1107AAT)
Buenos Aires, Argentina
(+54) 11 5235 5602

OFFICE IN PILAR

Chubut 1127
Pilar (B1629BAE)
Buenos Aires, Argentina
(+54) 0230 4427 677

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